Women’s Rights in Egypt. By Anna Mahjar-Barducci

“This is why women’s rights should be codified. Governments should be held responsible for treating men and women equally.”

Islamist Members of Parliament in Egypt are trying to deprive Egyptian women of their basic rights by introducing several controversial draft laws that, if passed, will bring Egypt back to the Middle Ages:

— The website Ahram Online reports that Islamists wants to cancel Law 1 of the year 2000, known as the Khula Law, which acts as an alternative route for women whose husbands refuse to grant them a divorce. Through the Khula Law, courts grant women a divorce so long as they return the dowry paid by her husband prior to the marriage. Law 1 of the year 2000 was considered a step forward in women rights. Before that, Egyptian women did not have the right to divorce their husbands on their own terms.

Khula Law’s opponents argue that a woman should not be able to ask for divorce, as it is against Islamic Sharia law. As reported by the news agency AINA, the Islamist lawmaker and main Khula Law’s opponent, Mohamed El-Omda, has argued that the process is an offense to the Sharia and that is a poorly hidden attempt to Westernize Egypt.

— According to media reports, Islamist parties are also preparing a draft law for early marriage that would permit girls to get married at the age of 14 instead of 18. As reported by Ahram Online, in the past few months, Salafist MPs have argued that there should be no minimum age for marriage for either sex, explaining that in the Sharia Law, an age for marriage is not specified.

Women activists are trying to campaign against this draft. “A license to drive, and to even vote, requires you to be 18 years old or older. Are those things more important than being a parent and forming a family?” said Azza Soliman, a legal assistant at the Centre for Egyptian Women. As reported by Ahram Online, she added she believes it is wrong to set the age of marriage below 18, or even “12, as some imply.”

— A controversial statement was instead made by Azza El Garf, a woman and a parliamentarian belonging to the Freedom and Justice Party, the political wing of the ruling Islamist group the Muslim Brotherhood ruling . Al-Garf clearly points out that she disagrees with the Egypt’s 2008 ban on genital mutilation, to which she referred as a barbaric practice as beautification plastic surgery.

– Egyptian media recently reported about a draft law that would allow a husband to have sex with his dead wife within six hours after her death. Members of the Egyptian parliament said that the draft does not exist and that it was a story made up by the media. However, as reported by Al-Arabiya, the “Farewell Intercourse” is not a new proposal. Last year, a Moroccan cleric, Zamzami Abdul Bari, was the first to state that a husband could have sex with his dead wife. The Moroccan cleric argued that marriage remains valid even after death adding, perhaps implausibly, that a woman can also engage in sex with her dead husband.

— Ahram Online also reports that Islamists have called for cancelling the implementation of CEDAW (the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women), adopted in 1979 by the UN General Assembly; they alleged that “it contains articles that contradict Islamic Sharia.”

Egypt’s National Council for Women is campaigning against the above mentioned Islamist initiatives that are targeting women rights, saying that “marginalizing and undermining the status of women would negatively affect the country’s human development.”

Amal Al-Malki, a Qatari author, has been arguing on Arabic Al-Jazeera that the Arab Spring has so far failed women in their struggle for equality: “We have no voice. We have no visibility… And I am telling you, this is why women’s rights should be codified; they should not be held hostage in the hands of political leaders who can change in a second, right? Governments should be held responsible for treating men and women equally.”

Source: http://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/3048/women-rights-egypt

Saudi Arabia : police order women to cover ‘seductive’ eyes

Saudi Arabia ‘s religious police will force women to cover their ‘very seductive’ eyes, said police spokesperson Mutleg An-Nabit, quoted by newspaper Al-Quds Al-Arabi.”We have the right to force women to cover their eyes,” the spokesperson said. The news has triggered many reactions in the Saudi kingdom, particularly after a man who had refused to hide his wife’s eyes behind a veil, as ordered by the police, was taken to hospital.

According to the newspaper, a fight had broken out between the man and the religious police. Apart from admission to hospital, the man in question will have to spend 20 months in prison and suffer 300 lashes.

Source: ANSAmed

Spain Facing Creeping Islamization [Part 2]. By Soeren Kern

In September 2011, the regional government in Catalonia revealed that during the first six months of 2011, it prevented 14 forced marriages and the genital mutilation of 24 Muslim girls.In December 2011, Lérida became the first municipality in Spain to ban the burqa head covering in all public spaces. Women found violating the ban will be fined up to €600 ($750).
Continue reading Spain Facing Creeping Islamization [Part 2]. By Soeren Kern

Spain Facing Creeping Islamization. By Soeren Kern

A radical Islamic preacher in Spain has been arrested for calling on Muslims to use physical and psychological violence to “discipline” errant wives who refuse to submit to Islamic Sharia law or obey their husbands.Spanish public prosecutors say Abdeslam Laaroussi, a charismatic imam from Morocco who preaches at a large mosque in Terrassa, an industrial city situated 30 kilometers north of Barcelona, is guilty of “incitement to violence against women” for “providing concrete examples of the manner in which wives should be beaten, how to isolate them inside the family home and how to deny them sexual relations.”
Continue reading Spain Facing Creeping Islamization. By Soeren Kern